Inside Pulse 12

Worth It: The Life and Times of a Low Level Professional Wrestling Personality – Introduction

I’m not a wrestler but I have been involved in some capacity of professional wrestling since the year 2000. I have wrestled; in my mind, though, calling yourself a wrestler requires a certain type of dues-paying which I was unwilling to do.

I don’t like pain, you see, nor do I care for exercise. I’m psychologically allergic to my own sweat. In spite of this mild-level of cowardice, I found a home behind the kayfabe curtain. And each week I’ll bring you my tales from backstage and sometimes from out in the ring.

I’ll never be a star in professional wrestling, but I know plenty. I’ve had brief encounters with Kevin Nash, DDP, Mark Henry, and even Chris Benoit. I was threatened by King Kong Bundy. I was screamed at by Jim Cornette. And I’ve watched Jimmy Valiant sell video tapes to a blind man.

I’ve seen talent develop, too. I was there for Karl Anderson’s first day of training – twice. I was nearly tased by Dean Ambrose when he was still called Jon Moxley. And I’ve been chased around the ring by The Monster Abyss in front of 24 people in Georgetown, KY.

Some of my best stories are from people you’ve never heard of but should have like Psycho Sam Cody or former WWF referee Roger Ruffen. There was a money mark named Lew who hid under the ring during a thunderstorm. Others are from guys who You absolutely will never hear about nor should you. But I’m going to tell their stories – not so they get recognition – but so you might learn something.

See, every day I get an email from someone who tells me it’s his or her dream to be a professional wrestler. They’ll do anything – whatever it takes – to make that dream come true. If I had a nickel for everyone who’s ever told me that exact thing and never even darkened the door of BoneKrushers, the professional wrestling school that produced stars like Jillian Hall, Wildcat Chris Harris, Abyss, and Karl Anderson – or any school – I could have retired long ago.

Well, maybe not.

But I would have at least paid back the money I’ve spent to fulfill my own dreams.

This column is the story of one man’s dreams come true on a very small scale and the bumps, bruises, lessons, and insights learned along the way. I hope you’ll laugh. I would love it if you cried. And most of all, I hope you are entertained.

Because, after all, that’s what makes the sacrifice worth it.

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