David Gray – Life in Slow Motion Review


David GrayLife in Slow Motion

Link: David Gray Official Website

The Inside Pulse:

For his sixth studio release, singer-songwriter David Gray distanced himself from the electronic underpinnings fans may be used to from previous efforts, such as: White Ladder and New Day at Midnight. Instead, Gray expanded the size of the band he worked with, and focused much more on subtle nuances that listeners will grow to appreciate.

Three years removed from his last album, the aforementioned New Day at Midnight, Gray decided to strip back the techno-feel that he has used on previous albums, and went all out with a subtle, simple record. This approach brings him closer to the audience, a feat that is difficult to accomplish, and yet, Gray seems to be improve on that ability with each subsequent release.

No, this album will not grab you by the balls, shake you violently and demand you listen, it gently nudges you awake on a Sunday morning and provides you with a soundtrack for your day; a backbeat of pure joy and expression.

Fear not, naysaying public. Contemporary British rock is not all shoe-gazing. This beautiful piece gives us all hope for what music can, should, and will be.

Positives:

Lyrically, Gray is the best he has ever been on the songs “From Here You Can Almost See the Sea,” “Alibi,” and “Nos da Cariad,” which is Welsh for “Goodnight Sweetheart.” He’s written a truly magnificent album, and although it may never receive the commercial success it deserves, it certainly belongs among the Best British Albums of the Past Five Years.

Negatives:

May be too soft, too subtle for some audiences.

Cross-breed:

Ryan Adams, Elvis Costello, Bob Dylan or Dave Matthews with Rufus Wainwright on piano.

Reason to buy:

Life in Slow Motion will go down as one of my top ten of the year. Yes, it’s low-key and gentle, but it has moments of enormous passion that you cannot resist. A full orchestra replaces the synth-pop beats that Gray might be known for (see: “Babylon”) and the results are striking.