Manhunter #16 Review

Review by Tim Sheridan

“Who’s Your Daddy Part 1: Family Plots”

Writer: Marc Andreyko
Penciller: Javier Pina
Inker: Fernando Blanco
Letterer: Travis Lanham
Colorist: Steve Buccellato
Asst Editor: Rachel Gluckstern
Editor: Joan Hilty

Published by DC Comics

This comic has nothing to do with Infinite Crisis. Do you know how rare that is in the world of DC Comics these days? Very. I just wanted to say how refreshing that is. Now don’t get me wrong, I’m enjoying the whole Crisis thang, but it’s really nice to just have a good comic book story that stands completely on it’s own, and is really good, to boot.
Much like the majority of the readers of this title, I’ve followed Manhunter from the beginning. And with the “One Year Later” event happening in nary a few months, it seems like the creative team here is starting to wrap things up from the beginning.

There is the subplot of Kate Spencer’s “father” starting to come to fruition, as well as the tale of Dylan’s oh-so-mysterious past. Everything is starting to be tied together. Frankly, I don’t know what is going to happen to this title post-Crisis, so I’m just enjoying what I can for now.

Despite those concerns, and even despite all the storylines being wrapped up, this title lives and dies by its characters and theme. I know that must just sound so “DUH!” but it’s the truth. Manhunter is still essentially about a new hero learning about herself and the job. It’s still a wonder to see Kate learning things about the hero business. It’s interesting to see how she finds her strengths, as well as her weaknesses (she has to work on the banter).

Oh, and Kate is offered a job with the government. DEO to be exact. So that it probably going to bring up a whole new set of issues in the coming months.

The art here is great. Pina and Bianco are not flashy artists, but remarkably solid ones, and their style works perfectly with Andreyko’s writing. I am reminded of Pia Guerra’s work on Y: The Last Man, because of the strong work in showing emotions on the characters’ faces.

So I’ve said it many a time before, but you really should be reading this book. It’s just good, and fun, and this is yet another issue that is perfect in showcasing the title’s strengths.