In Hindsight: The Ultimate Fighter 5 – Episode 1

So the first episode of this season is in the books, and as you know now, there were a few changes:

– All the fighters are lightweights (145-155lbs), meaning that not only do they have to fight 3 times to reach the finals, but that for the first time there are 16 (well, maybe 15) guys who are lighter than me that could kick my ass.
– This also means that Dana needs to come up with something to determine the round of eight.
– The coaches will actually fight in the finale, as opposed to a PPV. That means that you can tape their fight instead of downloading it off the internet.

So let’s go over the episode. Corey and Gabe get most of the initial face time, but we get some comments from Allan just so we know to go eat lobster at his restaurant. And later Allan tells us that he got into fighting to promote his restaurant. Which is not what I would call a logical next step. I’d figure that some local ads on Bucs broadcasts or maybe some signage during spring training would make sense, but getting into a ring or a cage with “Allan’s Lobstah Shack” on your ass? That’s probably not the way I’d go about advertising. But I gotta know – did it work?

So anyway, you can tell that Penn and Pulver don’t like each other, but as far as this competition goes, neither of them are idiots like Ken Shamrock, as they bring in some quality guys (none of whom are a “nutritionist”) as assistant coaches. I mean, yes Gabe, Pulver is a guy who likes to bang, but a guy who trained in McMilitech Fighting Systems is probably not dumb enough to impose his style on everyone else. That’s not how this show works, see?

But back to Penn and Pulver. BJ seems to be a bit paranoid, as he figures that Jens tired out the fighters before his evaluation. But this isn’t anything that we didn’t see during the first two seasons of the show. Of course, in the first two seasons, the coaches did evaluations at the same time. Kinda shows the respect Randy and Chuck had for each other, I suppose.

And it doesn’t stop there. Oh no. Penn engages in some Matt Hughes-style dickery as he asks “Oo wants to go home, and oo wants to go wit me?”

No, wait, that was this guy:

But the implication is the same – who wants to be with that loser Jens Pulver, and who wants to train with the only guy with a head bigger than Tito Ortiz and Barry Bonds combined and tends to gas out in important fights? Actually, I guess it really isn’t the same. The end result is that ten fighters want to be on Team Penn, and after some bickering and some claims of anarchy by Dana, the teams are picked, resulting in:

Team Team Penn Team Pulver
Fighters Gray Maynard Corey Hill
Matt Wiman Nate Diaz
Gabe Ruediger Brandon Melendez
Joe Lauzon Marlon Sims
Robert Emerson Manvel Gambaryan
Andy Wang Cole Miller
Allan Berube Brian Geraghty
Noah Thomas Wayne Weems
Trainers Rudy Valentino Matt Pena
Tony DeSouza Kirk White
Regan Penn Taisei Kikuchi

And back in the house, we get DRAMA! as Corey morphs into a trash talker all about getting in the face of Team Penn, and specifically Gabe.

Gabe, by the way, comes in at 175lbs, which is just a wee bit over the lightweight limit and about five pounds lighter than me. That’s insane. And BJ knows it too – he was all but ready to throw in the towel if Gabe was picked to fight first. Luckily for him, Cole Miller picks Allan Berube to fight, mostly because Berube is relatively inexperienced and an easy win. BJ’s game plan is basically to have Allan stay out of submissions, but again he’s already thrown in the towel, knowing that Allan won’t win.

And so it goes, to the fight. We of course get that great production where the fighters tell us what they’re going to do. The first round sees the fighters circling, exchanging jabs until Berube shoots and scores a takedown… right into a Cole Miller guillotine, which is sunk in pretty good. Then, off his back, Miller tries for a kimura, but Berube gets out of that. But the 6’1″ Miller eventually gets his legs up and wrapped around Berube’s neck, and secures a tight (side?) triangle choke, and “The Monster” is forced to tap at 2:33.

That was about as decisive as you can get. Berube pretty much knew that laying and praying was his only chance of winning, but you can’t do that in the lightweight division – opponents are always moving and looking for that opening. It was a decent way to open up the season, and Cole Miller is into the round of eight.

That’s it for this week.

Sir Linksalot: The Ultimate Fighter

Tags:

In Hindsight: The Ultimate Fighter 5 – Episode 1

So the first episode of this season is in the books, and as you know now, there were a few changes:

– All the fighters are lightweights (145-155lbs), meaning that not only do they have to fight 3 times to reach the finals, but that for the first time there are 16 (well, maybe 15) guys who are lighter than me that could kick my ass.
– This also means that Dana needs to come up with something to determine the round of eight.
– The coaches will actually fight in the finale, as opposed to a PPV. That means that you can tape their fight instead of downloading it off the internet.

So let’s go over the episode. Corey and Gabe get most of the initial face time, but we get some comments from Allan just so we know to go eat lobster at his restaurant. And later Allan tells us that he got into fighting to promote his restaurant. Which is not what I would call a logical next step. I’d figure that some local ads on Bucs broadcasts or maybe some signage during spring training would make sense, but getting into a ring or a cage with “Allan’s Lobstah Shack” on your ass? That’s probably not the way I’d go about advertising. But I gotta know – did it work?

So anyway, you can tell that Penn and Pulver don’t like each other, but as far as this competition goes, neither of them are idiots like Ken Shamrock, as they bring in some quality guys (none of whom are a “nutritionist”) as assistant coaches. I mean, yes Gabe, Pulver is a guy who likes to bang, but a guy who trained in McMilitech Fighting Systems is probably not dumb enough to impose his style on everyone else. That’s not how this show works, see?

But back to Penn and Pulver. BJ seems to be a bit paranoid, as he figures that Jens tired out the fighters before his evaluation. But this isn’t anything that we didn’t see during the first two seasons of the show. Of course, in the first two seasons, the coaches did evaluations at the same time. Kinda shows the respect Randy and Chuck had for each other, I suppose.

And it doesn’t stop there. Oh no. Penn engages in some Matt Hughes-style dickery as he asks “Oo wants to go home, and oo wants to go wit me?”

No, wait, that was this guy:

But the implication is the same – who wants to be with that loser Jens Pulver, and who wants to train with the only guy with a head bigger than Tito Ortiz and Barry Bonds combined and tends to gas out in important fights? Actually, I guess it really isn’t the same. The end result is that ten fighters want to be on Team Penn, and after some bickering and some claims of anarchy by Dana, the teams are picked, resulting in:

TeamTeam PennTeam Pulver
FightersGray MaynardCorey Hill
Matt WimanNate Diaz
Gabe RuedigerBrandon Melendez
Joe LauzonMarlon Sims
Robert EmersonManvel Gambaryan
Andy WangCole Miller
Allan BerubeBrian Geraghty
Noah ThomasWayne Weems
TrainersRudy ValentinoMatt Pena
Tony DeSouzaKirk White
Regan PennTaisei Kikuchi

And back in the house, we get DRAMA! as Corey morphs into a trash talker all about getting in the face of Team Penn, and specifically Gabe.

Gabe, by the way, comes in at 175lbs, which is just a wee bit over the lightweight limit and about five pounds lighter than me. That’s insane. And BJ knows it too – he was all but ready to throw in the towel if Gabe was picked to fight first. Luckily for him, Cole Miller picks Allan Berube to fight, mostly because Berube is relatively inexperienced and an easy win. BJ’s game plan is basically to have Allan stay out of submissions, but again he’s already thrown in the towel, knowing that Allan won’t win.

And so it goes, to the fight. We of course get that great production where the fighters tell us what they’re going to do. The first round sees the fighters circling, exchanging jabs until Berube shoots and scores a takedown… right into a Cole Miller guillotine, which is sunk in pretty good. Then, off his back, Miller tries for a kimura, but Berube gets out of that. But the 6’1″ Miller eventually gets his legs up and wrapped around Berube’s neck, and secures a tight (side?) triangle choke, and “The Monster” is forced to tap at 2:33.

That was about as decisive as you can get. Berube pretty much knew that laying and praying was his only chance of winning, but you can’t do that in the lightweight division – opponents are always moving and looking for that opening. It was a decent way to open up the season, and Cole Miller is into the round of eight.

That’s it for this week.

Sir Linksalot: The Ultimate Fighter

Tags: