Madhouse – DVD Review

madhouse

Oh terrible horror movies, why must you exist. Granted, this one is from the ’80s which was a completely different time in horror movies, but that doesn’t justify why they decided to release this one.

The story is basically this: A set of twin sisters grow apart over the years, one with some disease that horribly disfigures her and the other one is normal. The one with the disease breaks out of the hospital and starts killing all of her sisters friends with the help of a robot dog. It’s not called a robot dog in the script, but it’s obviously a not a real dog doing the killing. Then the creepy uncle and deformed sister hold a birthday party with the normal sister and all the dead friends. Cue hero rescue, cue end.

Most of the acting isn’t terrible, the creepy uncle is actually quite good, but everyone else is just kind of there. The mechanical dog is a terrible actor who makes me die a little every time it is shown on the screen.

The one thing I will give them credit for is the film making. Some of the shots are very good. I especially like the low angle shots they used. In some movies low angle shots are overused and take away from everything, but the low angle shots in Madhouse serve as a nice breakup of the normal monotony of shots.

The transfer to DVD is ok. It’s not what we’ve come to expect from DVDs but it’s a little better than VHS.


Madhouse is presented in 2.35:1 Anamorphic Widescreen format and Dolby Digital 2.0.


Pretty scant on the extras.

A interview with the director/writer Ovidio G. Assonitis (13:34)

Still photos from shooting.


For an early ’80s horror flick getting re-released it’s not terrible. But from just a movie being released point of view, it is pretty terrible.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..


Dark Sky Films Presents Madhouse. Directed by Ovidio G. Assonitis. Starring Richard James Baker, Allison Biggers, Trish Everly and Morgan Hart. Written by Ovidio G. Assonitis, Stephen Blakely, Fobert Gandus, and Peter Shepherd. Running time: 93 minutes. Not Rated. Released on DVD: November 25, 2008. Available at Amazon.com.