Blu-ray Review: Frankenstein Created Woman: Collector’s Edition



When Hammer made a wide variety of horror films with various monsters and scares on the screen. But the small English studio had two characters that were their big earners on the international market: Dracula (Star Wars: Attack of the Clones‘ Christopher Lee) and Dr. Frankenstein (Star Wars‘ Peter Cushing). Whenever they were having a new distribution deal for America, these two characters were the one most eagerly desired by Hollywood folks since they were the easiest to sell to theater owners and goers who enjoyed the Hammer horror. This was the case in the mid-60s when Hammer struck a deal with 20th Century Fox. First they delivered Dracula Prince of Darkness with the return of Lee to the fangs in 1966. A year later, they’d revive the diabolical doctor with Frankenstein Created Woman with Cushing returning from the grave to see if his brand of science can work with a female.

Universal’s Classic Horror era would have Frankenstein be the title associated with the flat top head creation of the doctor in the course of the sequels. Hammer made sure that we knew that there was only one Dr. Frankenstein and several creations with different identities. Only in the first film, Curse of Frankenstein did viewers get Cushing as the doctor and Lee as the Monster. The next film The Revenge of Frankenstein returned Cushing with an all new body and mind for his next attempt at creating life. Hammer was not going to merely sneakily remake the Universal flicks. Frankenstein Created Woman was not going to clone The Bride of Frankenstein in full color.

Baron Frankenstein has moved to a smaller town in Germany to avoid being noticed. The town is rather non-descript except for the Guillotine on the outer border. Frankenstein has latched onto a new idea that he can capture the soul from a body, store it inside unbreakable glass and use it to revive a dead body. It’s a rather revolutionary concept that he soon gets to put to work. Hans (Quatermass and the Pit‘s Robert Morris) has fallen for Christina (Star Trek‘s Susan Denberg). She the daughter of the innkeeper and has physical issues. But Hans adores her and gets angry when three local fancy lads bully her one night at the restaurant. The lads don’t take kindly to Hans actions. They return after closing and kill the innkeeper. Hans and Christina are no help because they are in bed. When the police interrogate Hans, he give them an alibi because he doesn’t want to expose Christina. Hans find himself meeting the same fate as his father on the Guillotine. Christina accidentally sees the blade come down and it’s all too much for her. She jumps in the river and drowns. Luckily Frankenstein is there. He captures Hans’ soul and preserves Christina’s body. He wants to merge the two lovers into one. But can this work better than his previous experiments?

Frankenstein Created Woman is the second best in the Hammer’s seven movie series after The Curse of Frankenstein. Part of this is Cushing never looking more dashing in the role of the scientist who must always play God. His hair looks enthralling on screen. He also creates a body that doesn’t look like a plastic surgery disaster. When he brings Christina back to life, Frankenstein fixes up her face, adjusts her bones and bleaches her hair blond so the locals don’t recognize the new girl in town. Denberg does a remarkable job playing her character on both ends of the transformation. Her only high profile roles after posing in Playboy as Miss August 1966 was being one Mudd’s women on Star Trek and being a Frankenstein creation.

Frankenstein Created Woman brings out the best in Cushing’s character who just can’t back down from proving that you can overcome death. Although nobody should complain when he’s got an urge to revive Christina.

The video is 1.66:1 anamorphic. This new transfer was struck from the original film elements. The color and resolution brings new life into the film. The audio is DTS-HD MA 2.0 Mono to let you hear the plans of the mad scientists. The movie is subtitled.

Audio Commentary With Author/Film Historian Steve Haberman and Filmmaker/Film Historian Constantine Nasr digs into the history of the film and where it stands in the Hammer vault.

Interview With Actor Robert Morris (11:19) allows him to remember his first major film project. He discusses having to position himself to block Denberg’s nudity from the camera.

Creating Frankenstein Created Woman (12:13) interviews Camera Assistant/Clapper Loader Eddie Collins And 2nd Assistant Director Joe Marks. The duo talk about what it was like to work behind the camera on a Hammer production.

Audio Commentary with Derek Fowlds, Robert Morris, and Film Historian Jonathan Rigby has the actors recount their time at Bray Studios working with Cushing.

World Of Hammer Episode The Curse Of Frankenstein (24:46) covers the various Frankenstein films that were made at the studio. The show is mostly clips with a narration from Oliver Reed.

World Of Hammer Episode Hammer Stars: Peter Cushing (24:45) tracks the roles the actor played in various Hammer productions. It also features the narration of Oliver Reed.

Hammer Glamour (44:10) is a special about several of the actresses who brought a touch of beauty to the beastly scares found in a Hammer Horror.

Theatrical Trailers includes the double feature trailer for when it played with The Mummy’s Shroud.

TV Spots tantalize you with the woman that Baron Frankenstein brought back from the grave.

Radio Spots will make you want to turn the wheel towards you nearest drive in.

Still Galleries (11:12) includes Movie Stills, Posters, And Lobby Cards.

Scream Factory presents Frankenstein Created Woman: Collector’s Edition. Directed by Terence Fisher. Screenplay by: John Elder. Starring: Peter Cushing, Susan Denberg, Thorley Walters, Robert Morris, Peter Blythe and Derek Fowlds. Rated: Unrated. Running Time: 92 minutes. Released: June 11, 2019.

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